Weekly Photo Challenge: Change

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Change

Oh Miss Murphy, look how big and beautiful you are! Cow looks a little worse for wear, however.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Color

Weekly Photo Challenge:  Color

…standing on the shore in Apgar Village, Lake MacDonald in Glacier National Park…

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…view from our hotel in Vancouver, BC…

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…as seen through Montana’s crystal clear water…

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…driving near Helena, MT…

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A Busy Spring Break

Tonight is the last night of spring break.  I feel so very lucky to have this week off–and after volunteering to direct the community garden, I needed the time.  I had raised beds to set and fill and landscaping fabric to lay.  We were absolutely blessed with gorgeous weather.  My freckles emerged from hibernation.  It was in the sixties, with blue skies and a warm sun.  That is, until yesterday.

My awesome helpers

My awesome helpers

The very first plot holders meeting of the season was yesterday morning at 11 am.  When I went down to the garden at 9:30, it was breezy with some spitting rain.  Not too bad.  By the end of the meeting, it was full-on raining horizontally.  We were all shivering, and I just kept talking faster and faster so everyone could go home and get warm.

Still, it was a great turn out.  Nearly every plot holder made it to the meeting which I (silly me) scheduled on the same weekend that the ski mountain closed.  I have never seen so many people in our garden at one time.  It really rather warmed my heart (if not my freezing cold and wet hands).  I could already feel the beginnings of a “community”.   I provided some history to the garden, handed out keys, gave an orientation to the garden and the shed, answered questions, and had plot holders sign up for maintenance duties.    It was raining hard enough that the ink was running as they filled in their names.  They were troopers!

Something safe to plant...under Reemay

Something safe to plant…under Reemay

They need to be, to some extent.  Gardening in Montana, especially in the springtime, isn’t easy.  It is a constant battle with schizophrenic weather and cold nights.  Still, it is a rewarding “fight” and we have been gathering the necessary weapons to be victorious (hello, extended metaphor!)  We use Reemay fabric and Wall O’Waters to keep our young plants warm.  We watch the weather forecasts religiously.  Finally, around the fourth of July, after babying our plants, we can relax our guard and watch as delicious and healthy food grows in abundance.

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Our raised herb garden

It is possible to garden in the northern climes–it just takes some trial and error, and much vigilance.  And it is worth it.  Trust me.

 

 

Columbia Falls Community Garden

Wow!  What a fantastic day!

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Today was a major work day in the garden.  We had kids from the Center for Restorative Youth Justice complete some service hours in the garden.  The amount of work they accomplished in four hours is simply amazing…it would have taken Naomi and me days to do what they did.  Thank you to Anders and Keara from CRYJ for organizing the kids and providing positive support and encouragement.

Anders and Keara...working long after the last of the kids they were supervising had gone home.

Anders and Keara…working long after the last of the kids they were supervising had gone home.

Together, we set two raised beds, and lined the bottoms of them with cardboard.  We smoothed out seven paths between plots, put the dirt in the raised beds, and laid black landscaping fabric.  The kids smoothed out the land under where the greenhouse and herb garden will go, and laid landscaping fabric .

Our raised beds, nearly ready for onions, shallots and leeks.

Our raised beds, nearly ready for onions, shallots and leeks.

The community garden is really starting to come together.  Today, a nice man named Marshall walked by and inquired about the garden and available plots.  We are technically full, but a few of us have more than one plot and are prepared to give them up for newcomers.  Also, Naomi found a few more spots for half and irregularly shaped plots.

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I spoke with two nice ladies, Mary and Lucy, about the garden as I was leaving today, and I am so appreciative of their encouragement and kind words.

We had two plot holders stop by, as well as a former plot holder, and their children played merrily in garden while we worked and chatted–discovering earthworms, ladybugs and the joy of digging in the dirt.  It was truly a wonderful day–exactly what a community garden is meant to be.  It was filled with laughing children, chatting adults, and hard, gratifying work.

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Three years ago Naomi and her friend Connie put in motion the creation of our community garden. I joined in, along with others.  Today, we have seen the fruits of our labor.  A fully reserved garden, happy plot holders, and youths reconnecting with the community and the land.  This is what a community garden should be.  This is what our community garden is becoming.

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Lucy stopped by today with her kids to check out the garden. Even though she wasn’t dressed for it, she couldn’t resist digging into her plot!

Thank you to everyone who helped make it to this point!

 

 

 

A Dozen Homemade Organic Garden Remedies

I think I may have to try some of these…

Hope Gardens

12 home remedies

Veggie gardens need special care. Vegetable plants are prone to all sorts of disease and fungus. They are highly sought after by pests both big and teeny teeny tiny. A slight negative change in their environment can cause them to stop producing. And we aren’t happy when our veggie garden is just limping along…we want it to thrive!

We also expect our vegetables to be nutritious and safe to eat; and as if that’s not enough, we demand our gardens be harmonious, attractive and a boon to their environment.

This is a lot to ask of our humble garden, but it can be accomplished! Generations of our ancestors have done it, and they’ve done it with less. Maybe we should follow their lead…

You can do it with less by using homemade natural remedies to treat pests and disease. With readily available ingredients, fertilizers too can be mixed up right…

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